Un-intangible

He’s bought a rocket cheap, metal and polished red.

Second hand without wings, rubbed the rust off with a tiny handkerchief.

He fancies setting out on it and cover a small distance,

The fuel prices have gone up.

Newer budgets are known to fuel anger.

Just take a round around humanity,

And set it back down near the post office, if it flies dangerously low.

He promised to not read the letters in it,

But dig a few and place them on his typewriter- its keys were broken.

A lock at the door was useless now,

Just as useless as his red rocket, and rising fuel prices.

Fuel has hardly been a reason for war.

Word prompt by Daily Post: Broken

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Tinted Glass

She lingered around the windows,

In the empty house full of maids and cooks and a butler.

The husband went on business trips, he laughed at her habit-

“If only you knew what there is beyond your silly window-world.”

But he went on alone, she would be too tired from travelling so much.

She lingered near the windows, draped in rich sarees, the ends pulled down her head

That covered an arm’s length effectively.

Moved from one glass case to the other with dainty grace taught by generations of good housewives.

But her decisive fingers pulled down the wooden blinds every time a rebellious sound broke the midday silence.

Eager eyes scanned side to side, peering through layers

Of cloth, of wood, of glass.

At figures interrupted by blinds and a printed veil,

A few inches of thick glass.

Music floated in the air, drifted away,

And the void was filled with more.

Eager eyes peered relentlessly through layers at every sound, at constant music emanating from a distant gramophone.

But her husband decorated her windows- his sweet gesture of love,

Thick white glasses were replaced with carved tinted ones, dark red and emerald.

He laughed with contentment, “You shall see a more colourful world from now.”

She still stood by her windows in her empty house,

Pulled down the blinds sharp at every sound,

And peered through prints, wood and coloured glass,

At shapes and sizes interrupted by layers one too many

She tried hard to make sense of her colourful world.

Prompt by Daily Post: Constant

A Fairytale

“Why are the letters running up and down?”, a pair of five year old eyes looked at me in surprise.
“Because I want them to do some exercise.”, my disgruntled eyes were fixed on the frenzied movement of my blog page, my finger on the scroll button.
“Stop! You’re hurting the letters, they’re tired already!”
Sigh. If only he knew what a writer’s block is. I kept deleting old posts out of frustration.
“Can I tell you a story?”, he looked at me eagerly. “I have made it up.”
“Sure, go ahead.”
“Once upon a time”, his eyes sparkled brightly, “there was a poor girl. She lived in a dirty, old house. She sobbed and sobbed, she was very sad.”
“Did a pretty fairy come and help her?”
“No, but there lived a princess opposite to her house. The poor girl saw the princess wear beautiful dresses and shoes. She wanted them too. They were green and blue and sparkly. But she didn’t have any, so she went back to weeping. She thought that a pretty fairy would surely come to her rescue, or a prince, like in all your stories. But no one came. So after some time, she wiped her eyes, got up and went to play in the forest.”
“So she never wanted those dresses again?”
“No, she decided she’s better off without them. What if the large frog swallowed her seeing all the glitter on her clothes?”, he widened his eyes.
There was a sound at the main entrance. The little boy ran to the window and shouted with joy, “There she is! I can go and play outside now.”, and off he went barely mouthing a bye.
With a smile I clicked on the “new post” button on my blog.

Via Daily Post: Forest

Here and Now

The smoke is always floating precariously in the air,
Threatening to fall face down on the earth, bringing down a few storeys with it.
The glass doors are more wary of the ugly soot.
They are cleaned twice everyday,
By men, cloth in hand, moving their arms in a robotic up-down-up.
But they are not robots, yet.
The glass doors are a big fraternity, and one leads to another.
They sell attractive work-life-soul packages at discounted rates.
The smoke looms large above each, slowly moving from one place to another.
Glass mannequins wonder how fast they can escape with their long, sword-like heels.
Anxiously adjusting sparkling big stones around their necks, whispering to each other, “Will the smoke dull this shine?”
Plastic forests with their lush enthusiasm fail to assure of environmental regeneration.
They bow their plastic heads in shame, their great grandmothers could draw up water from the earth.
Men run around excitedly, they’re not afraid of anything.
Maybe they need a gun, or a tight lasso, and they’ll take down that arrogant black cloud in no time.
Maybe they need a pair of robot hands- easy.
The great cloud smirks as thinner layers curl up from long pipelines every day.

Via Daily Post: Forest

Less bright red flowers

I feel a damp against my wiry body,

Spiralling against my non- spine, my fire-red flowers untouched,

Dirty green moss the colour of her saree on the wall.

I look again at her wiry body, a peek of ribs and white skin from the side.

I look down today at the less bright flowers from yesterday.

A bend from the waist, bony hands pick flowers

From the ground for oily hair snaking down a thin back.

Her passionate love for my flowers, though dead and smell-less

Lying on the ground. She cannot reach the ones sticking loosely to the wiry green body against moss covered bricks.

I long for her bony hands to pluck the bright wonders off my skin, drop them into fair palms cupped together.

She moves into the kitchen for the day, my flowers adorn a long oily trail, held together with a knot. I can only hear bangles clinking, a mechanical melody accompanying a mechanised grinding of coconut.

They will soon smell of coconut and turmeric, smell-less flowers from yesterday.

She throws them before her husband returns, our dried little secret. Fresh sandalwood paste on a broad forehead.

She always returns the following day. A moment alone, a treasure island of less-bright flowers strewn around.

A damp from the moss green wall against mine. I feel a damp against both our bodies. And I do not long for her glass bangles.